•  
  •  
 

English Title

EFFECT OF A COMMONLY USED VETERINARY ANTIBIOTIC ON PLANT STRESS

Keywords

Antioxidant enzyme, ABC plant transporter, veterinary antibiotic, tolerant species, proline, lipid peroxidation.

Disciplines

Agriculture | Biochemistry | Molecular Biology

Abstract

Antibiotic accumulation in soil and plants is a rising problem in agriculture creating a serious threat to living organisms in the environment, hence needing huge attention. To this end, glasshouse pot experiments were conducted to simulate contamination by veterinary antibiotic at 150 mg kg-1 and 4800 mg kg-1 in a virgin soil in which lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.), chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) and cress (Lepidium sativum L.) were grown, aiming at evaluating the potential toxicity of antibiotic in plants roots during their growth period. Biomarkers of toxicity such as malondialdehyde and proline levels and antioxidative enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; and guaiacol peroxidase, POD) were analyzed in the roots of the four species. In addition, gene expression level of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-SOD and CAT4, IFS /IFR that are key enzymes in the isoflavone pathway, and four ABC transporters MRP2, MRP4, TT12, and PDR11 that are involved in detoxification processes were evaluated.

Among all four vegetables, chickpea had the highest antioxidant activity with reduced lipid peroxidation in roots treated with the highest antibiotic concentration suggesting its antibiotic tolerance. Cu/Zn-SOD was not the key player in SOD activity. High antibiotic concentration inhibited the antioxidant activity in lentil, arugula, and cress implying their sensitivity. In treated arugula, SOD and POD activities decreased synergistically while CAT increased; whereas, in treated cress, POD and CAT were induced at low antibiotic concentration and inhibited with the high one. Gene expression displayed tolerance of chickpea and sensitivity of arugula to the antibiotic added. Our results reveal toxic effect of antibiotic on lentil, arugula, and cress with chickpea exhibiting higher tolerance to high antibiotic concentrations

Among all four vegetables, chickpea had the highest antioxidant activity with reduced lipid peroxidation in roots treated with the highest antibiotic concentration suggesting its antibiotic tolerance. Cu/Zn-SOD was not the key player in SOD activity. High antibiotic concentration inhibited the antioxidant activity in lentil, arugula and cress implying their sensitivity. In treated arugula, SOD and POD activities decreased synergistically while CAT increased; whereas in treated cress, POD and CAT were induced at low antibiotic concentration and inhibited with the high one. Gene expression displayed tolerance of chickpea and sensitivity of arugula to the antibiotic added. Our results reveals toxic effect of antibiotic on lentil, arugula and cress with chickpea exhibiting higher tolerance to high antibiotic concentrations.

Author ORCID Identifier

Safaa Nassar - https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0207-8755

Jamilah Borjac - https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7722-5617

DOI

https://www.doi.org/10.54729/RDPK3669

ISSN

2706-784X

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.